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Transitions

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The first anniversary of anything is a big deal, right?  A wedding, a baby’s birth, buying a home -- these events drop pins in space and time, guiding us back to reminisce with the clarity, tenderness and grace only time provides. This week has brought us to a new first anniversary, the beginning of the Covid 19 pandemic, and how one year ago our lives were utterly transformed in a matter of days. I remember zooming into a meeting with the TNS staff, discussing the best way to serve our students while the safer at home orders were in place.  NONE of us anticipated that a full year later we would still be offering zoom lessons, and that our lexicon would grow to include words like social distancing, quarantine, distance learning, and essential worker.  Yet a year later, the vocabulary is here to stay, we’ve learned myriad lessons along the way, and finally, we see a faint flicker of hope on the horizon. As more people get vaccinated and cases trend down, we will face another transition-

We Love Take Note Studio

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If you are in our Kindermusik program, you may have noticed our “We Love” theme this month, celebrating the love we have for our studio families and our community.  We want to take this opportunity to inform you of a few things you may not know about us that will make you love us even more; namely, we are a nonprofit organization, which allows us to pursue our mission--nourishing hearts and minds with music for life--beyond our studio doors. If you are not familiar with the details, being a nonprofit means we operate our organization for a collective benefit as opposed to generating profit for our owners. Simply put, any funds over our operating expenses are used to further our mission. We do this to bring the power of connection through music to a few specific causes we deem exceptionally worthy.  First, we support the people who make Take Note Studio possible -- our studio families. Each year, we give away thousands of dollars of scholarship funds for Kindermusik, instrument lessons

“Being a mother comes as naturally to me as being an astronaut.”

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Author and clinical psychologist, Harrier Lerner has a lot to say about parenthood. She puts readers at ease by sharing, “Being a mother comes as naturally to me as being an astronaut.” I appreciate her candid reflection and confession. Parenthood is challenging. We would never expect a first-year aerospace engineering student to know “all the things about space.” So, why is it that we expect ourselves to know “all the things about parenting.” Sigh. We launch into parenthood -one way or another- sleep deprived, fueled by coffee, and hoping to somehow land among the “stars.” We did, after all, “shoot for the moon,” right? The sky's the limit with our parenting journey. When I think about it, Lerner is really onto something with her comparison. Parents and astronauts alike navigate time and space. I admire an astronaut’s ability to stay curious, present, flexible and self-regulated enough to solve problems in space (you know, a place without gravity? Earth-side parents can, at the ve

Conscious Discipline

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These days, it seems every sentence I write starts with a qualifier about the state of the world -- these unprecedented times, this rollercoaster of a year , etc. From the pandemic, the never-ending US Presidential election and all the things in-between, this year has been a lot to manage, especially for parents. Like many others, I am home every day with my children, home schooling and supporting virtual learning, doing my best, as so many of us are, to keep them safe, happy and thriving. Every day as I reflect on the world and my place in it, I thank my lucky stars for our health, our resilience, and Conscious Discipline. Have you heard of Conscious Discipline?  Up until I became a Take Note Studio parent, I hadn’t.  Before learning about it, I was skeptical -- why do I need a course in discipline? My children are angels! (that’s a joke.) For real though, I had no idea what Conscious Discipline (CD) was or why it was relevant to my work as a parent, until I witnessed CD methods i

Music for Life

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If you are reading this, you’re probably a Take Note Studio family, and you probably already understand the value of what our studio offers your family and child.  As a studio parent myself, I love the way Kindermusik fosters creative play and introduces foundational music skills to my four year old. I love how, while we are mostly homebound during the pandemic, my seven year old can log into Zoom and connect with familiar faces through songs and silly dances in Theatrical Singers.  I love that maintaining connection with the families we have met at the studio feels effortless because music is our common bond.  As our kids grow and their schedules fill up, it's hard to prioritize the endless activities and experiences available to them.  There are so many fun things to do!  Not all activities are created equal, though.  Much like when we plan meals for our kids, we offer them a wide variety of nourishing foods to keep them healthy and growing -- some childhood experiences are more

Welcome Back!

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  Welcome back, Take Note Studio families! Whether you are learning virtually or in the studio, we are so happy to be together again!  Do you remember back in March when we thought sheltering in place for 14 days would defeat Covid and get us back to normal?  HAAAAAAAA. How's your normal looking this year?  Our studio staff is with you; we have our own children from baby on up to adult and we are all navigating the best way to keep ourselves healthy (and sane) as we prepare our minds and bodies for more structured learning this fall.  It’s been helpful for me to talk with others in our community to see how this transition is going for them. No matter the educational/work/daycare model you have, this fall is drastically different for everyone, and if you’re anything like me, it can leave you feeling unsure and overwhelmed.  Talking with the Take Note staff about their struggles and successes has been so refreshing -- I didn’t realize how valuable the small talk at school pick up or

Distance Learning Curve

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I don’t know about you, but when I was a kid, there was clearly a right and a wrong way to do school.  The right way involved sitting still, listening to the teacher, and more often than not, being rewarded for reaching the “right” answer.  The wrong way looked like disruption, wiggling, and feeling the resentment of peers as the teacher had to, once again, address interruption of everyone else’s learning.