Posts

Confidence and Performance Anxiety

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     In just a few weeks our Instrument Artistry students, including our Studio Singers group, will have the opportunity to bless more than their own homes with their music and confidence at the TNS Holiday Recitals. However, we know that this can produce some anxiety. Here are some tips that our educators have compiled to start thinking about: Instead of talking about being nervous, think of it as being excited. The two have similar physical aspects: sweating, shaking, butterflies etc. if we say we’re nervous it can be associated with messing up or negative thoughts, but if we talk about how excited we are, we can have fun and be excited to perform. Performing as often as possible before the recital is helpful to get more comfortable playing for an audience. You'll find weak spots that were never an issue and will build confidence as friends and family compliment them and you'll get a sense of different emotions/experiences they felt before the big recital. Practice introducin

5 Ways Kindermusik Teaches Kindness and Empathy

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     Over the years, countless friendships have been forged inside the walls of our Kindermusik classroom - between children and between their grown-ups!      The weekly classes and inclusive environment present many gentle, loving opportunities for your child to learn to get along and show empathy -- all while creating meaningful relationships with others. Sharing      From Level 1 of Kindermusik all the way up to Level 5, sharing is an important part of demonstrating cooperation and selflessness. As new instruments are passed out or two kids share a scarf for a partner activity, your child gets to practice the valuable skills of sharing and working together. Taking turns      Whether it’s waiting for the teacher to pass out scarves or waiting to pass the ball in a circle activity, taking turns helps your child learn patience. Your child also practices being empathetic because their friends in class are also waiting for their turn! Ensemble Play      This well-beloved activity is pres

Staff Sharing: "The Music Advantage"

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Some members of our team have benefitted from a training on the book,  "The Music Advantage" by Dr. Anita Collins, and we  wanted to share with you some of the learning we've experienced!   Music has an incredible impact on the brain (more than anything else!) and significantly benefits children in essential ways. Check out this  video Children in any of the following categories are particularly impacted by the power of music: Ages 0-7 Involved in lessons for 2+ years Experiencing any learning differences (ADD, dyslexia, autism etc) YOU are offering such a necessary gift to your children through their music education. Keep it up! To learn more, watch Dr. Collins' Ted Talk  here  or read this book:

Not Just For Your Child: How Kindermusik Makes Parenting Easier!

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We want to let you in on a little secret. Although most parents choose to enroll in Kindermusik for their child’s benefit, after a few classes, they begin to realize Kindermusik is for them, too. Kindermusik really can help make great parenting easier... and a whole lot more musical and play-filled!  Here are a few reasons why: You get a break. We know that being a parent means more than just, well, being a parent. It means being a nurse, short-order cook, maid, chauffeur, activities director, photographer, diaper changer (and other related pleasantries!), personal shopper, hair stylist, and all around person-in-charge… 24 hours a day; 7 days a week. But for one moment each week in class, you can relax and let us inspire and support YOU for a while. Child development insight. Each week in class your child will laugh, sing, dance, and play instruments while we equip you with the research behind the methods. Plus, you’ll learn more about your child’s learning style, how it looks in a cla

9 Ways to Make the Most of Kindermusik

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We know that Kindermusik is an investment in your child, and we want to ensure that you make the most of it. So, we put together a list of tried-and-true ways to help you do just that! 9 ways to make the most of Kindermusik:  Show up. Sounds easy enough, right? But we know it’s not. We understand how busy life can be. We also understand that children and adults get sick. Or it snows or rains or your little one finally takes a nap (30 minutes before class!). It happens. Do your best to attend each week. If you can’t make it, just let us know, and sign up for one of our make-up classes. Arrive 5-10 minutes early. Most children need a few minutes to transition into something new. Those extra few minutes give your child the opportunity to take off shoes, find a spot to sit, interact with others in class, or even to explore the room. Connect with other parents in class. When you arrive a few minutes early, it gives you time to get to know other parents who understand the unique joys (and ch

When My Child Runs...

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     As you child warms up to the classroom (or right off the bat), you may see him/her start to become more active in our large spaces, ie RUNNING! We staff often see looks of helplessness, frustration, embarrassment, or oblivion on the faces of parents :) Let us first say, YOU ARE NOT ALONE, and we want to help make your experience at Kindermusik a joyful one for both you and your classmates.  Here are a few tips: Level 1 (ages 0-2.5):  Once those little legs start moving, they just don't want to stop (and they get faster!) This is age appropriate. You have two jobs at this stage:  Moving WITH your child -- follow them, find ways to engage with class wherever they need to be: hold their hand, pick them up, and MODEL inhibitory control (the ability to STOP when you want to GO). This takes LOTS of practice at this stage. It's exhausting, we know, but so important and you will see the results in time, we promise!  Keeping everyone safe. If your child is causing themselves or oth

Noticing

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It has been so lovely hearing the sounds of piano, singing, and laughter in the halls of Take Note Studio this fall! After a year and a half of uncertainty, we are thankful to be together again.  The class I teach, theatrical singers , was fully virtual last year, and transitioning back to in-person learning has been both wonderful and challenging.  My co-teacher, Miss Heather and I have been brainstorming ways to help our students remember how our class works through meaningful interactions instead of lectures. We’re not a typical classroom, we like to keep things loose and fun to encourage participation, but with a group of elementary school students, you might imagine that things can veer off course rather quickly.  One thing we find that works to keep things on track is the power of noticing. Ms. Heather and I are both devoted Conscious Discipline followers, so noticing has become second nature to us.  This, I assure you, has not always been the case.  How many of us were told “go